Book Review – Daisy Jones & The Six

Daisy Jones & The Six is an oral history of 70's rock stars Daisy Jones and Billy Dunne and his band, The Six. When the two pair up, their music is instantaneously the stuff of legends, the rock and roll American's craved in the 1970s. But their worlds didn't merge with ease. With rock and roll came sex and drugs. And with sex and drugs came trials and tribulations. Like any band, they navigate relational strain, differing dreams and the lengths they'll go to to stay together... or be apart.

The stars aligned for book 13. I brought my March Book of the Month selection to book club and book club voted it our April read! That is a serious case of killing two birds with one stone in my world.

Book 13:
Daisy Jones & The Six
by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Genre:
Historical Fiction

Published:
March 2019

Synopsis According to Mandi:
Without spoilers, Daisy Jones & The Six is an oral history of 70’s rock stars Daisy Jones and Billy Dunne and his band, The Six. When the two pair up, their music is instantaneously the stuff of legends, the rock and roll American’s craved in the 1970s. But their worlds didn’t merge with ease. With rock and roll came sex and drugs. And with sex and drugs came trials and tribulations. Like any band, they navigate relational strain, differing dreams and the lengths they’ll go to to stay together… or be apart.

Favorite Quote(s):

“Don’t count yourself out this early, Daisy. You’re all sorts of things you don’t even know yet.”

– Taylor Jenkins Reid, Daisy Jones & The Six

Awards (based upon my brief research):
None yet.

Pages:
368

My Overall Rating:
5 – You know those times when you ask a question about some old movie star or some old band and then three hours later, you’re still scrolling your phone and you know way too much about that person or band, but you’re so fascinated that you don’t even care? That was me with this book. In fact, I think this book is written to capture precisely people who fall prey to that phenomenon. I can’t quite explain how much I wish this book was true… or how much I believed it was true while reading it. I was absolutely captivated by this story. I wanted to know their story. I wanted to hear their music. I wanted to see their performances.

Plus, I love, love, loved the writing style. Written as an oral history, it’s the first book I’ve read that felt like watching a movie rather than reading. I could hear them talking. I could see them sitting with their interviewer, pausing in answers, laughing at questions, tearing up at memories. Taylor Jenkins Reid hit the writing style out of the ballpark. This was so fun.