Tag Archives: Reading

Book Review – Murder, Motherhood, and Miraculous Grace

Murder, Motherhood, and Miraculous Grace is Debra Moerke’s true story of the stations God has called her to in life, be it a profession, a relational role, or a major traumatic hurdle. Debra and her husband had fostered numerous children, but none affected her life quite so much as the Bower children did. When tragedy strikes, and the Bower children’s mother, Karen, calls from prison asking a colossal favor of the Moerkes, Debra has to decide whether she’s all in for what she believes or not. Can she extend a miraculous amount of grace from one of the darkest episodes of her life? What does this mean for her family? And how can you even move forward from such a traumatic mile-marker?

Book Review – The Glittering Hour

The Glittering Hour is the story of high-society’s flapper-girl Selina Lennox getting involved with penniless artist Lawrence Weston despite her better judgement. With the financial stability and social status secured in Rupert Carew – who was all but handed to Selina on a silver platter – Selina had to choose what mattered most to her in life and where she could carve out her best future. It’s a story of love, choice, tragedy and riches. A story of secrets and mystery. A story of truth.

Book Review – The Beantown Girls

The Beantown Girls is about the Red Cross Clubmobile girls who served coffee and donuts overseas to soldiers in the second World War. For women wanting to do their part in the war, heading across the ocean just to be seen by and talk to soldiers was a simple yet obviously dangerous task. Beyond coffee and donuts, they brought the soldiers a level of familiarity and comfort they were missing being so far away from home, risking their lives for their country and living on next to nothing.

Book Review – The Giver of Stars

The Giver of Stars is the fictional story of one group of women who road into the Appalachian Mountains between 1935 and 1943 as a part of the Pack Horse Library Project, Eleanor Roosevelt’s traveling library. Delivering books to those in remote regions of Kentucky, these women saw all kinds of characters and watched stories unfold as they passed out stories to people who wouldn’t otherwise have access to them. In their quest, they’re toughened up, bonded together and the center of the town’s controversies.

Book Review – The Man with No Borders

The Man with No Borders is the fictional story of Jose-Maria Alvarez reflecting on his life from his death bed. His past is filled with struggles, secrets and salmon. As he attempts to come to terms with the life behind him, his memories flood his mind and push him towards the ultimate decision of whether or not to accept who he is, what he’s done and how he’s affected his family.

Book Review – You Me Everything

You Me Everything

You Me Everything tells the story of Jess and her 10-year-old son, William, and their summer vacation in France at William’s dad’s hotel. In an attempt to strengthen the bond between father and son, Jess agrees to spend the summer in the vicinity of Adam, her ex-boyfriend to give her son the father he’s yet to have and needs.

Amidst their vacation runs summer flings, dredged up pasts and secrets. Can Adam be the father William needs? Will the truth about the past be revealed? And can the secrets of the future change fate? It’s cute. It’s funny. It’s heart-wrenching.

Book Review – Rosemary: The Hidden Kennedy Daughter

Rosemary: The Hidden Kennedy Daughter

Rosemary: The Hidden Kennedy Daughter tells the story of Joe and Rose Kennedy’s reaction to having an intellectually disabled daughter in the early/mid 1900s. Born into the rich and famous Kennedy family, the beautiful Rosemary had everything going for her… except her disability. At a time when disabilities as such were not well dealt with by society, the Kennedys did what they could to keep Rosemary hidden away for public relations purposes as they sought political power, even stooping to the level of having her undergo a lobotomy in hopes of “curing” her. However, they could not predict the outcome her life would have on their family. It’s possible her plight was not in conjunction with the “Kennedy Curse”, but rather a blessing to their family and to society as a whole.